Everything You Need to Know About Voting in 2020 – An Easy Guide

We want every single Arizonan to have information about how easy and convenient it is to vote in this year’s election.  Our suggestion: no matter how you vote, vote EARLY — either by mail or at an early voting location. 

In Arizona, you can cast your ballot at your leisure weeks before the election. This is great for your own peace of mind, and helps our community too. If you vote early, you’ll be one less person poll workers will have to serve on Election Day, and the county recorder’s office can get a head start on counting your ballot.

Early voting begins Wednesday, October 7. Join the Crescent Ballroom family and be a First Week Voter.

Make a plan to vote! There are three ways to vote early this year:

  1. Vote by mail
  2. Drop your ballot off at a voting location or official drop box in your county
  3. Vote early in person at an early voting location


Quick link to Judges / School Board / Propositions / Endorsements 



Do I still have time to register to vote in the 2020 election? 

You have until October 15.  Click HERE to register.



Can I check if I’m registered or already signed up to get my ballot by mail?

You bet! Get out your driver’s license and head to iWillVote.com. You’ll enter some basic information including your license number and the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office will confirm your registration status and whether you’re signed up for the Permanent Early Voter List (PEVL). 



I want to vote by mail. Is it too late?

It’s not too late! October 23 is the last day to request a ballot by mail or sign up for the Permanent Early Voter List.  You can sign up HERE.



I received my mail-in ballot. What are my options?

First, fill out your ballot and then make sure to seal and sign your ballot. No additional postage is required.

1. You can simply place in your normal outgoing mail or any USPS mailbox.  The Arizona Secretary of State’s office suggests you give yourself enough time and mail it back no later than October 27 (If you cannot mail your ballot back by October 27, it is recommended you drop it off at a voting location or ballot drop box.)

2. Drop it off any early voting location:

Maricopa County sites HERE, Pima County sites HERE, Or go to iWillVote.com or VoyAVotar.com for all sites in AZ.

* If you’re near downtown Phoenix, you can drop off your ballot 24/7 at a secure ballot drop box located at 510 S 3rd Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85003*

3. On election day, you can drop off your ballot at any polling place. You don’t have to wait in line!



I want to vote early in person.

You can vote in person early starting October 7.  Just bring an acceptable form of ID to an early vote location. 

Maricopa County early vote locations HERE, Pima County early vote location HERE. or go to iWillVote.com or VoyAVotar.com to locate the voting site nearest to you.



I received a mail-in ballot but I want to vote in person. Can I?

You can! If you get your ballot in the mail, but choose to vote in-person, your vote will be counted as soon as your county confirms that you didn’t vote twice.  (So make sure to trash your mail-in ballot if you decide to vote in person)

*This is also true if you ruin or lose your mail-in ballot. Just go to any vote location and cast your vote in-person.



I’m a little old school and want to vote in person on election day, November 3.

To find your local polling place – If you’re in Maricopa County, find your polling place HERE, if you’re in Pima County, find your polling place HERE, for all other Arizona polling places click HERE.

Remember if you are in line by 7pm, you have the right to vote. And don’t forget to bring an acceptable form of ID.



Can I track my mail-in ballot to see if it was counted?

Easy peasy. No matter how you vote, you can check the status of your ballot online. Click HERE



What is the most secure way to vote?

Arizona voters have many options for secure voting. Whether you vote by mail, in-person, or want to fill out your ballot at home and drop it off in person, we recommend doing it as early as possible! Being a First Week Voter is the best way to ensure your ballot is submitted on time.



Is it Covid safe to vote in person this year?

Polling locations will have physical distancing and additional safety protocols. If you have any issues or questions about voting, call 1-833-VOTE-4-AZ (1-833-868-3429) For more information on staying safe while voting in person, check out the 2020 AZVoteSafe Guide.



Can I trust voting by mail this year?

Arizonans have voted by mail safely and securely for years. Voting by mail in this election is safe, secure, and reliable — and it’s also popular! In the 2018 midterm elections, 78% of Arizona voters voted by mail; that percentage was 88% for this year’s primaries. If you have any other questions about voting by mail, visit the Secretary of State’s website HERE.



When I sign my mail-in ballot return envelope, how can I check to make sure my signature matches the one on file?

The county will try to match the signature on your ballot envelope with whichever signature they have on file. In most cases, this is the signature on your driver’s license.



What do I do if I missed the deadline to mail back my ballot?

Good news! you can drop it off at an early vote location before November 3, or at any polling place or vote center on November 3. And you don’t even have to wait in line! Just drop it off before 7 p.m. on November 3.




IMPORTANT DATES

● October 7 – The first day to Early Vote in person at voting locations. In addition, Arizona counties mail out ballots to voters who signed up to get their ballot by mail.

● October 15 – The last day to request a ballot by mail or sign up for the Permanent Early Voter List and the last day to register to vote — this is an updated deadline, again!

● October 27 – Recommended deadline to mail back your ballot-by-mail

● October 30 – Last day of in-person early voting

● November 3 – Election Day! All ballots must be received by 7 p.m. or voters must be in line to vote in-person by 7 p.m.



But wait, there’s more!

Remember, there’s more on the ballot this year than just presidential candidates. Your ballot will include candidates for the U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, Arizona State Legislature, County Board of Supervisors, and depending on where you live, sheriffs, mayors, city council, school board and more.

Now is the time to do your research so that you’re ready to fill out your entire ballot top-to-bottom when it arrives. You can even bring notes with you if you plan to vote in person!

Download the Secretary of State’s 2020 General Election Publicity Pamphlet to learn more about what’s on your ballot including information on judges starting on pg 15.

If you live in Maricopa County, visit BeBallotReady.vote to learn more about who and what will be on your ballot.

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JUDGES / SCHOOL BOARD

The progressive leaning Civic Engagement Beyond Voting has put out “Gavel Watch 2020” with recommendations and information on judges – HERE

Progress Arizona, “a digital hub for Arizona progressives”, compiled recommendations for school board and other down ballot races – HERE



STATEWIDE PROPOSITIONS

Arizona Proposition 208, Tax on Incomes Exceeding $250,000 for Teacher Salaries and Schools Initiative

Teacher Salaries and Schools Initiative, is on the ballot in Arizona as an initiated state statute on November 3, 2020.

A “yes” vote supports this ballot initiative to:

  • enact a 3.50% income tax, in addition to the existing income tax (4.50% in 2020), on income above $250,000 (single filing) or $500,000 (joint filing) and 
  • distribute the revenue from the 3.50% income tax to teacher and classroom support staff salaries, teacher mentoring and retention programs, career and technical education programs, and the Arizona Teachers Academy.

A “no” vote opposes this ballot initiative, thus keeping the highest income tax rate at 4.50% (in 2020) on income above $159,000 (single filing) or $318,000 (joint filing).

This proposition is supported by State Superintendent of Public Education Kathy Hoffman, the Arizona Education Association, Stand for Children and more.


This proposition is opposed by Governor Doug Ducey, numerous business associations and Chambers of Commerce, and more.



Arizona Proposition 207, Marijuana Legalization Initiative

Arizona Proposition 207, the Marijuana Legalization Initiative, is on the ballot in Arizona as an initiated state statute on November 3, 2020.

A “yes” vote supports this ballot initiative to legalize the possession and use of marijuana for persons who are at least 21 years old, enact a tax on marijuana sales, and require the state Department of Health and Human Services to develop rules to regulate marijuana businesses. Proposition 207 would place a 16% tax on sales and would divided between community colleges, municipal police, sheriff,  fire departments, Highway User Revenue Fund, and the Justice Reinvestment Fund.

A “no” vote opposes this ballot initiative, thus keeping the recreational possession and use of marijuana illegal under state law in Arizona.



MARICOPA COUNTY AND PHOENIX PROPOSITIONS

Maricopa County Special Health Care District, Arizona, Proposition 449, Continue Property Tax Levy

A “yes” vote supports continuing a property tax—estimated at $19 per $100,000 in assessed value—to provide funds for the Maricopa County Special Health Care District for a period not to exceed 20 years.

A “no” vote opposes continuing a property tax to provide funds for the Maricopa County Special Health Care District for a period not to exceed 20 years.

Among supporters of Proposition 449 are U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz.; Maricopa County Sheriff Paul Penzone; Arizona Nurses Association executive director Robin Schaeffer; Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego; Mesa Mayor John Giles; Arizona Medical Association chief executive officer Libby McDannell; Ann-Marie Alameddin, Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association president and chief executive officer; and Steve Zabliski, executive director for St. Vincent de Paul in Phoenix. (Arizona Republic 10/6/2020)

More information HERE.

Phoenix, Arizona, Proposition 444, Continuation of Local Expenditure Limit

This measure allows the city council to set its own spending limits, providing for a more flexible budget. The Arizona Constitution sets a spending limitation for cities. The state constitution also allows city voters to override this limitation.  

Voters in Phoenix had approved such an override every four years between 2000 and 2016.  This proposition is supported by Mayor Kate Gallego and former City Councilman Daniel Valenzuela.



ENDORSEMENTS

To see the endorsements of the Sierra Club Grand Canyon Chapter and their voting guide, click here.

To see the endorsements of Planned Parenthood Advocates, click here.

To see the endorsements of the Arizona Chamber, click here.



If you have any issues or questions about voting, call 1-833-VOTE-4-AZ (1-833-868-3429)